Drip, Drip, Drip

When Richard Nixon was suspected of covering up the Watergate break in, the country was shocked at the fact that the President was using his office to cover up political hanky-panky. Nobody liked or trusted “Tricky Dick” or thought such deeds beyond him but no body thought he was selling out the country in any way, shape or form. He had won the election—his second—convincingly and a lot of his policies were clearly good for the country. He’s the man who gave us the Clean Air Act, for example. When suspicions arose, a special prosecutor was appointed and when the evidence came—drip,drip,drip—that he was as guilty as we thought, public opinion and support in Congress swung around and it was time for him to go.

Suspicions swirl around Trump. Every day there’s another drip of evidence that something is up. But it’s not that he was involved in hanky-panky, though he was, or covering up some dirty tricks. We suspect that that he is acting in some way in the interests or at the behest of a foreign government, our primary enemy or opponent on the world stage. This is the kind of crime that would have shocked Nixon and he had been McCarthy’s errand boy. I suppose we’ll need a few more drips before we can get our heads around the idea that we’ve got a sort of Manchurian president, but we shouldn’t wait too long to do a full investigation. If Trump is Putin’s puppet—and he sure acts like it—then we need to know and to get him out. And if he isn’t then he needs to be cleared. And he needs to explain why he has acted toward Russia the way no one else in America does so he can get to work as President.

It’s time for Trump to release his taxes in an open forum and let the truth come out for all to see.

 

Author: leonardrysdyk

Leonard Rysdyk is the author of more than a dozen novels, stories, articles and poems. His work has appeared in many publications including Snow White, Blood Red, The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Aboriginal Magazine and the New York Review of Science Fiction. A professor at Nassau Community College, he teaches literature (including science fiction), cultural history (including the history of science) and is an acknowledged innovator in the field of Computer Aided Instruction (CAI), a subject on which he has lectured and consulted.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s